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all because of you

Posted on 22 November 2004 by Caryn Rose (5)

U2 Take Manhattan, 11-22-04

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There was actually a time when this was all brand new. There was a time when no one knew who U2 were, when the people who did felt like they were part of some odd club of outsiders, espousing this odd Irish rock band who weren’t dark or moody, who were eager and striving and earnest, who did things with sounds and guitars we hadn’t heard before, not put together in the way that they did. Shimmering, echoing guitar together with lyrics that were half jigsaw puzzle, half psalm.

There was a time when no band had done anything like this before, when it was the most exciting thing in the world, when we would ask the DJ at New Wave Tuesday or Thursday to please please please play some U2 for us, please, we come here every week, dressed to the nines as best we could, Converse and Capezios and Boy of London and Reminiscence and Fiorucci. Toward the end of the night, he would humor us by putting on “I Will Follow” (since he stood a chance of more than us just knowing it), and we would pogo around the dance floor as though our lives depended on it, stake out the parameters of the floor like it was our own private territory, daring anyone who wasn’t one of us to participate. No one ever did, of course; U2 just weren’t cool. We knew this, and we didn’t care; we weren’t cool either and we didn’t care.


It’s a love-hate relationship with this band, isn’t it? They are just so astronomically enormous that it’s just easier to hate them; and funnily enough, now they are considered classic rock, a band full of old men. It’s easy to wish Bono would shut up sometimes (okay, we’ve probably thought that since the days of “This is NOT a rebel song!” was a running joke); it’s even easier to claim overexposure and oversaturation and close your ears. I know this, because I almost did it this time.

Luckily, luckily this band of fools that have always thought big are still thinking big, and decided to take over New York City, staging a video shoot-cum-record release extravaganza by playing on the back of a flatbed truck all over Manhattan (stolen, oops, borrowed from the Stones), ending up on the East River, at the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge, as twilight faded over Manhattan and the city lit up as magically as ever. With this as a backdrop, here are U2. I am glad in the end it didn’t end up in Central Park or Washington Square Park (Sunday morning’s rumor du jour), because this setting was magnificent, and they deserved it; it did them justice.

But I get ahead of myself. Of course, they spent the day driving around the city, while I waited in line in Brooklyn, and then stood in front of a stage in Brooklyn, and then, all of a sudden, someone in the crowd says, “There they are!” There they are, driving across the Manhattan Bridge, playing, and we are asked to wave and cheer (like we needed to be asked), and Bono actually starts jumping up and down and waving at us. That was the moment that I didn’t feel silly that I had to lie about my age to get into this gig (funnily enough, I had fake ID the first time too, Mudd Club, year unknown – this time, the audience procurement service was screening out anyone over 40; I created an account making me 29 and no one looked at me twice).

Despite earlier hype trumpeting them as “the world’s greatest rock and roll band” (I must not have gotten that memo), they walked onstage kind of unceremoniously, no fanfare; just – there’s Edge! and the rest followed. Of course, the first song was “Vertigo” and even though it feels like you have heard it so much you never want to hear it ever again as long as you live (and I don’t listen to commercial radio and don’t watch much tv), it’s a great fucking song. You feel like they wrote it in 10 minutes – because it’s so great and so classic U2 and feels like something that wrote itself. “Hello, Hello,” sings Bono, and then holds the mic up so we know to sing “HOLA!” along with the Edge. It’s brilliant, I tell you, brilliant.

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Both Bono and the Edge look better than they did on SNL (and Edge at this point is timeless); Bono in this natty leather coat with military silver buttons that I covet irrationally. Larry is wearing the same shirt that he wore on SNL — “The only man in this band hard enough to not wear a coat in Brooklyn in the winter,” Bono announces, after pointing out Adam’s elegant fur or velvet or something soft and plush and warm-looking coat. Now, let me tell you, Adam Clayton has aged so well, the rough edges are gone, but he still could play the next James Bond. We’re talking debonair here.

I’m sorry, did I digress? I guess I did.

“All Because of You” (which should have been played on SNL and may have been played once the cameras were off), “Miracle Drug” with a long and interesting explanation about the song’s inspiration (former Mount Temple classmate and poet Christopher Nolan) that isn’t going to hold up once they hit arenas and/or stadiums. “Sometimes You Can’t Make It On Your Own,” once again dedicated to Bono’s father, two years deceased now – about how when people leave this planet, sometimes they leave a gift behind, and for Bono, the gift was getting those beautiful glorious high notes back (which were very much present tonight as well).

“City of Blinding Lights” is introduced with a lovely description of the first time U2 came to New York. And I know he’s done this before, and I know it could be seen as staged or tiresome, but they fucking love this city; it was magic to them as children. If you weren’t lucky enough to grow up here, or be close enough to it to take it for granted, you cannot ever know how powerful it is to someone far away from it. “This chorus is about New York… looking over at Brooklyn.”

I am admiring this big green shiny guitar onstage, that is for Bono; I joke earlier about its use as a video shoot prop, that lead singers shouldn’t play guitar. And when he does pick it up, Dallas (the Edge’s guitar tech) has to come out and seemingly spend 10 minutes explaining this instrument to him. And then, he steps up to the mic, but then stops himself, steps back, and asks “Plectrum?” to Adam, who shares one of his picks with him. He realizes, then, that it’s a bit of a show, and we know it is, and he starts to feel bad about it, almost, acknowledges it with a shy smile and a murmur I don’t recall exactly.

“Is there a light on the Edge? I know there’s a light in the Edge, but…” he says, since Edge is in the back on keyboards. Bono explains that this one’s a bit new, and they’re going to work it out acoustically (“Original of the Species”). Now, this is when all my grumbling about ‘spontaneous, my ass,’ stopped. Because they didn’t have to do this on this stage, now, in front of everyone. There are enough handlers, and, you know, people who can do things and arrange things and insulate them and communicate with MTV or what have you and explain how important it is that the band be displayed in their best light.

Or you can be U2, you can be Bono and Larry and the Edge and Adam, and go up there and wing it, and make mistakes, and show the frayed edges of frustration (Bono angry that “I Will Follow” didn’t end as sharply as he wanted; wonder how the band feels about his lyrics-as-constant-improvisation;). And you can be in that moment after taking a chance, when your fingers tentatively hit the guitar strings and want to try something, and there’s enough love in the crowd and enough bravery onstage to try it. It can’t be, can it? No, I’ve got to have the song wrong. I don’t have the whole catalog on my iPod (for some reason yet unknown to me), I just must not be remembering it right.

“Darkness falls and she
Will take me by the hand
Take me to some twilight land…”

“She’s A Mystery to Me,” which was tentative and poignant and heartfelt, and I realize that this song could be written about this city as much as it could be about a lover or any woman. But it’s not rehearsed and it’s clearly not planned, and Adam has to go over to work it out with Bono, or maybe it was for support, but it was mindblowing because it came out of nowhere.

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The best “Beautiful Day” – or the one that felt the best – that I have ever heard was next, tons of crowd participation, everyone knows this, even the jive talking, Ben Harper and Dave Matthews blathering frat boys behind us, and then, those chords I love so much, you know, I listened to Boy for hours and hours and days and days, and despite my grumbling about “alternate lyrics” I am pogoing, along with Bono, along with the crowd, it is frantic and rocking and liberating and joyous, and in that moment, it was the same feeling as being a teenager just becoming an adult and finding my place in the world, and finding out what was mine and what I would claim as mine. Even with the sloppy lyrics and the slightly askew performance, it was still blindingly powerful and inspiring.

The encores weren’t planned, “Out Of Control” (as I said to the boyfriend via cell phone when I was walking back to the subway, and had 30 seconds to tell him what it was like: “I have three words for you – ‘Out Of Control'”). And then, Bono steps forward with deliberation, and says, “This one’s for us,” and it’s “Vertigo” again, and yes, it is for them, they are going to bash it out, they are going to conquer it publicly, they are going to win this one, thank you very much, and we’re going to watch them.

The sun has set, the sky is dark, the Brooklyn Bridge is brilliantly lit, the other bridges stretching across the river and beckoning us home. This performance was nothing short of fucking magical, you know? And while I won’t give them the “greatest” title just yet, there is a reason they are huge, there is a reason they have fans in every corner of the globe, there is a reason they are still here: because they are a completely amazing band, who are still trying to grow and set new challenges and try to conquer them. Maybe they will, maybe they won’t, but I’ve learned my lesson about giving up on them.

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5 Responses to “all because of you”

  1. Blogcritics says:

    U2 Invade NYC

    The day began with what people thought were random U2 sightings all over Manhattan, and then slowly, people came to…

  2. benny blanco says:

    good writing. and damn… you were up close. i felt lucky enough just to get into the staging area, not just left of center and about 200 ft away for all of this. spendid recall of the bono speak.

    ez.
    bb

  3. alyssa says:

    Nice one, C.

    Color me soo green. Thanks for letting me be there vicariously.

  4. nancy drew says:

    Glorious account – how incredible it must have been to be there! You’ve ramped up my anticipation of the upcoming tour when we can all hopefully have a chance to expand our U2 experience. Thanks for the report!

  5. Alicia K says:

    This is a fabulous entry. I am as green as Bono’s guitar with envy.